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Unforced variations: Dec 2011

Filed under: — group @ 1 December 2011

Open thread for December…


406 Responses to “Unforced variations: Dec 2011”

  1. 401
    Ron R. says:

    Wush, the same thing occurred here. thousands of acres of oaks were cleared and replaced with eucalyptus, thought at time to be profitable for the building industry. Then they discovered their propensity to split. So there they stand. It too is monocultural with very little growing under it. What works well for one environment may not work for others.

    Course now they’re growing GM trees with reduced lignin content to make them better suited for the building and paper industries and we open up a whole new can of worms.

    http://tinyurl.com/7lbq959

    I don’t agree with all the science worshippers we read here from time to time. Yes science has done a lot of good medically, convenience and knowledge wise, But like Ian said on Jurassic Park:

    What’s so great about discovery? It’s a violent, penetrative act that scars what it explores. What you call discovery, I call the rape of the natural world.

    The Eocene would have seemed unbearably hot to us. The Miocene was on a par with heat predicted for ACC today. I happen think the Middle Miocene was a paradise for those animals that evolved with it but it would have been one we, and many other species today are unadapted to. And it’s coming on quickly. So now we are spectators to and participants in major change. The question is: how bad will it get and will we be able to adapt in time?

    Hank Roberts “Claiming faith, or hope, or trust that biology will pull our chestnuts out of the fire at just the right time seems Panglossian aka cornucopian.”

    Do you have a better idea (see Gavin’s response #365 above)?

    I’m not ready to abandon all hope.

    ——

    My theory has always been, that if we are to dream, the flatteries of hope are as cheap, and pleasanter, than the gloom of despair.
    Thomas Jefferson

    Every area of trouble gives out a ray of hope; and the one unchangeable certanity is that nothing is certain or unchangeable.
    John F. Kennedy

    [Response:Your comments are drifting farther and farther from relevance to anything having to do with climate.--Jim]

  2. 402
    Hank Roberts says:

    “One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds.” — Aldo Leopold

    “Don’t waste any time in mourning. Organize.” — Joe Hill

  3. 403
    wush says:

    Seems we may have been at it a long time! The first human-induced global warming?
    http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2010/2010GL043985.shtml
    Quote;- We hypothesize that the extinction of mammoths increased Betula cover, which would have warmed Siberia and Beringia by on average 0.2°C, but regionally by up to 1°C. If humans were partially responsible for the extinction of the mammoths, then human influences on global climate predate the origin of agriculture.

    Question;- Did we eat that many mammoths? &
    Does this mean our current policy of sustainable forest management in the NH is having a warming effect too? We plant a lot of evergreen conifer forests which reduce the albedo and we don’t slash and burn forests in this area like we do in the rainforests.

    [Response:read this--Jim]

  4. 404

    #401–

    Hank Roberts “Claiming faith, or hope, or trust that biology will pull our chestnuts out of the fire at just the right time seems Panglossian aka cornucopian.”

    Do you have a better idea (see Gavin’s response #365 above)?

    Yes–work like hell to mitigate carbon emissions.

  5. 405
    Ron R. says:

    Do you have a better idea (see Gavin’s response #365 above)?

    Kevin McKinney Yes–work like hell to mitigate carbon emissions.

    That goes without saying.

    [Response:Your comments are drifting farther and farther from relevance to anything having to do with climate.--Jim]

    Yes, sorry.

    /comments

  6. 406
    Ray Ladbury says:

    Ron R.: “I don’t agree with all the science worshippers we read here from time to time.”

    It really is a pity you are not sufficiently astute to appreciate the irony of your using a computer to broadcast your anti-science ignorance across the globe.

    Science has benefited humans in far more than material terms. It has given us understanding of our world and banished demons back to the deepest realms of our unconscious. And it has provided us with a way of avoiding our dangerous tendency toward unrealistic and overly optimistic thinking if we would but take advantage of. Why not try it.


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