RealClimate logo


Ten years of Realclimate: By the numbers

Filed under: — group @ 10 December 2014

rc10Start date: 10 December 2004

Number of posts: 914

Number of comments: ~172,000

Number of comments with inline responses: 14,277

Minimum number of total unique page visits, and unique views, respectively: 19 Million, 35 Million

Number of guest posts: 100+

Number of mentions in newspaper sources indexed by LexisNexis: 225

Minimum number of contributors and guest authors: 105

Minimum number of times RealClimate was hacked: 2

Busiest month: December 2009

Busiest day of the week: Monday

Number of times the IPCC and the NIPCC are mentioned, respectively: 357, 5

Minimum number of Science papers arising from a blog post here: 1

Minimum number of RealClimate mentions in Web Of Science references: 14

Minimum number of RealClimate mentions in theses indexed by ProQuest: 33

Posts highest ranked by Google by year:

2004 CO2 in ice cores
2005 Water vapour: feedback or forcing?
2006 Al Gore’s Movie
2007 Swindled!
2008 FAQ on climate models
2009 The CRU Hack
2010 Feedback on cloud feedback
2011 Misdiagnosis of surface temperature feedback
2012 Extremely Hot
2013 The new IPCC climate report
2014 Climate response estimates from Lewis and Curry

All numbers are estimates from latest available data, but no warranty is implied or provided so all use of these numbers is at your own risk.

The most popular deceptive climate graph

The “World Climate Widget” from Tony Watts’ blog is probably the most popular deceptive image among climate “skeptics”.  We’ll take it under the microscope and show what it would look like when done properly.

So called “climate skeptics” deploy an arsenal of misleading graphics, with which the human influence on the climate can be down played (here are two other  examples deconstructed at Realclimate).  The image below is especially widespread.  It is displayed on many “climate skeptic” websites and is regularly updated.

Watts_world_climate_widget

The “World Climate Widget” of US “climate skeptic” Anthony Watts with our explanations added.  The original can be found on Watts’ blog

What would a more honest display of temperature, CO2 and sunspots look like? More »

Recent global warming trends: significant or paused or what?

As the World Meteorological Organisation WMO has just announced that “The year 2014 is on track to be the warmest, or one of the warmest years on record”, it is timely to have a look at recent global temperature changes.

I’m going to use Kevin Cowtan’s nice interactive temperature plotting and trend calculation tool to provide some illustrations. I will be using the HadCRUT4 hybrid data, which have the most sophisticated method to fill data gaps in the Arctic with the help of satellites, but the same basic points can be illustrated with other data just as well.

Let’s start by looking at the full record, which starts in 1979 since the satellites come online there (and it’s not long after global warming really took off).

trend1Fig. 1. Global temperature 1979 to present – monthly values (crosses), 12-months running mean (red line) and linear trend line with uncertainty (blue) More »

Unforced variations: Dec 2014

Filed under: — gavin @ 3 December 2014

This month’s open thread. Think history, Lima, and upcoming additions of a single data point to timeseries based on arbitrary calendrical boundaries.

A clearer picture how climate change affects El Niño?

Filed under: — rasmus @ 28 November 2014

I still remember the first time I was asked about how climate change affects El Niño. It was given as a group exercise during a winter school in Les Houghes (in France) back in February 1996. Since then, I have kept thinking about this question, and I have not been the only one wondering about this. Now I had my hopes up as a new study was just published on the evolution and forcing mechanisms of El Niño over the past 21,000 years (Liu et al., 2014).

More »

References

  1. Z. Liu, Z. Lu, X. Wen, B.L. Otto-Bliesner, A. Timmermann, and K.M. Cobb, "Evolution and forcing mechanisms of El Niño over the past 21,000 years", Nature, vol. 515, pp. 550-553, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13963

Switch to our mobile site