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Comprehensive climate glossary

Filed under: — rasmus @ August 9th, 2008

Glossary cartoon from Marc Roberts Recently we received a request for setting up a glossary-only search mechanism, or perhaps one web page with a long list of glossary entries with hot links to full explanations. The glossary that we already have is a good start, but we are all busy and it’s hard to find the time for extending this.

But there are also a number of external web pages which provide climate-related glossaries, such as the NOAA (they also have a seperate page for paleo-stuff), the Bureau of Meteorology (Australia, and there is even one by the Australian EPA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, the U.S.), and the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC, the U.S.). Wikipedia also has a glossary for climatological terms.

For those who seek the explanation for more bureaucratic terms, both the EU and the UNFCCC provide glossaries that may be useful.

Furthermore, there are some nice resources available, such as the Encyclopedia of Earth.

Aerosol Aérosol

Filed under: — group @ December 21st, 2004

A collection of airborne solid or liquid particles, with a typical size between 0.01 and 10 µm and residing in the atmosphere for at least several hours. Aerosols may be of either natural or anthropogenic origin. Aerosols may influence climate in two ways: directly through scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly through acting as condensation nuclei for cloud formation or modifying the optical properties and lifetime of clouds (from the always useful IPCC glossary).

See-also: wiki:Aerosol.

Particules pouvant être solides ou liquides, en suspension dans l’air, qui ont une taille comprise 0.01 et 10 µm, et qui résident dans l’atmosphère au moins quelques heures. L’origine des aérosols peut être soit naturelle, soit anthropogénique. Les aérosols peuvent influencer le climat de deux manières : soit directement par la dispersion et l’absorption des rayonnements, soit indirectement en servant de noyaux de condensation pour la formation des nuages ou en modifiant les propriétés optiques et la durée de vie des nuages. (définition provenant du très utile glossaire du GIEC).

Antarctic Oscillation (“AAO”) Oscillation Antarctique

Filed under: — group @ November 28th, 2004

Measure of the pressure gradient between the polar and subpolar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. Term was introduced by Thompson and Wallace (2000). More information on the AAO can be found here. See also Arctic Oscillation (“AO”).

Mesure du gradient de pression entre les régions pôlaires et sub-pôlaires de l’Hémisphère Sud. Ce terme a été employé pour la première fois par Thompson et Wallace (2000). Plus d’informations sur l’Oscillation Antarctique peuvent être trouvées ici. Voir également Oscillation Arctique.

Anthropogenic Forcing Forçage Anthropogénique

Filed under: — group @ November 28th, 2004

Forcing due to human, rather than natural, factors. Such factors include increased greenhouse gas concentrations associated with fossil fuel burning, sulphate aerosols produced as an industrial by-product, human-induced changes in land surface properties among other things.

Forçage dû à l’action humaine, par opposition aux facteurs naturels. Les facteurs d’origine humaine incluent (entre autres) l’augmentation de la concentration en gaz à effet de serre associés à la combustion de carbone fossile, les aérosols sulfatés issus de l’industrie, et les changements des propriétés de la couverture terrestre liés à l’action humaine.

Arctic Oscillation (“AO”) Oscillation Arctique

Filed under: — group @ November 28th, 2004

Measure of the pressure gradient between the polar and subpolar regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The term was introduced by Thompson and Wallace (2000). More information on the AO can be found here. See also North Atlantic Oscillation”(NAO”).

Mesure du gradient de pression entre les régions pôlaires et sub-pôlaires de l’Hémisphère Nord. Ce terme a été employé pour la première fois par Thompson et Wallace (2000). Plus d’informations peuvent être trouvées ici. Voir également : Oscillation Nord Atlantique.


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